Dane Standish

Dane Standish

Dane Standish

RN, Intensive Care Unit
IU Health Methodist Hospital
Indianapolis, IN

 

 

WHY DID YOU BECOME A NURSE?

I genuinely love helping people. From a young age, I knew that I wanted a career serving others. I had no idea what that might look like professionally until I discovered healthcare. Nursing was the perfect avenue for me. It combines my love of biology and helping people.  

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO ATTEND ST. ELIZABETH SCHOOL OF NURSING? 

Not only was the location convenient––halfway between my hometown and my wife’s family in Dayton, Ohio––St. Elizabeth’s accelerated program took into account the credits I earned during my undergraduate years, and counted them towards my degree.  

WHAT IS YOUR BEST MEMORY FROM NURSING SCHOOL? 

 When I was doing my ER rotation in White County, I thought I’d see sporadic patients with head colds or perhaps a few scraped knees. Instead, I witnessed my first live birth. A woman in labor didn’t quite make it to the hospital in Lafayette in time. It was absolutely a miracle to witness. 

I also have fond memories of spending time with Patty Lunsford in the St. Elizabeth library. With the amount of studying I did, it became my second home during nursing school. Patty and I spent hours discussing our love of Indiana University, nursing and day-to-day life. 

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO A NEW NURSE?  

The best piece of advice I happened to overhear was from a doctor while mentoring his residents. He said, “I don’t want to hear a ‘maybe’ answer. I want to hear you tell me that either you know it or you don’t.” Wise words I’ve carried with me throughout my career. It’s okay if you don’t know the answer to something. Continue to educate yourself on the latest in healthcare and evidence-based best practices. 

WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST ABOUT YOUR CURRENT JOB? 

Being in critical care, you literally have a hand in saving people’s lives. It might not happen every day nor does every patient survive. We care for people at their most vulnerable moments. The bright side is the success stories. The ones where you know God had a hand in saving someone’s life because there is no other explanation for it.  

WHAT IS THE TOUGHEST PART ABOUT BEING A NURSE? 

I work in a profession where I witness sad moments. That’s when I lean on my faith, especially when it feels like death has come too early for someone who, I felt, had so much life left to live. Yet, I know God has a bigger plan than the ones we have for ourselves, and that includes when He calls us home. 

HOW DO YOU SEE YOURSELF AND YOUR NURSING PRACTICE THROUGH THE LENS OF THE SCHOOL'S MISSION OF PREPARING NURSES TO CONTINUE CHRIST'S HEALING MINISTRY? 

My faith is in the Great Physician––Jesus. I know God opened doors for me to attend nursing school, allowing me to merge my love for science and medicine with following in the healing footsteps of Christ. My job also lends itself to me becoming bolder sharing my faith. I once saw a physician praying bedside with his patient and it blew my mind. It gave me the confidence to pray alongside patients rather than telling them I’ll add them to my prayer list. 

WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN YOU'RE NOT AT WORK?

My family loves to be outdoors. In warm weather, you’ll find us walking to the park, playing outside or attending outdoor concerts. When I’m not working or studying for my critical care certification, being with my wife and kids is the best part of my day.